Principles for Responsible Investing

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IFC Launches Framework for Impact Investing with Commitments by 60 Global Investors

On April 12, 2019, the International Finance Corporation (IFC), a World Bank Group, officially launched their Operating Principles for Impact Management (the Principles).  As of the official launch date, 60 global investors have committed to the Principles.  The first adopters range from large asset managers, private funds to non-profit investment firms.  The focus of the Principles is on impact investing, a term that IFC defines as “investments made into companies or organizations with the intent to contribute to measurable positive social or environmental impact, alongside a financial return.”  IFC adapted this definition from GIIN and notes that impact investing focuses on more than just avoiding harm or managing environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks; it aims to utilize investing’s ability to positively impact society by “choosing and managing investments to generate positive impact while also avoiding harm.”  This focus seemingly goes beyond the UN initiated Principles of Responsible Investing or UN PRI, which were tailored to the idea of responsible investing – investing with the goal of incorporating ESG factors into decisions in order to manage risk and generate long-term returns.
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Credit Ratings Agencies Increasing their Focus on ESG Risks

Fitch Ratings announced on Monday that it has launched a new integrated scoring system that shows how environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors, such as climate change, human rights and labor issues, impact individual credit rating decisions.

Its ESG Relevance Scores are sector-based and entity-specific. Fitch has started with over 1,400 non-financial corporate ratings, which it is initially making publicly available at www.fitchratings.com/site/esg.  In contrast to other third-party ESG ratings available in the market today, Fitch states that these scores do not reflect judgments as to whether an entity has positive or negative ESG practices, but rather discloses how an environmental, social and/or governance issue specific to the entity influences its current credit rating. 
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