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IFC Launches Framework for Impact Investing with Commitments by 60 Global Investors

On April 12, 2019, the International Finance Corporation (IFC), a World Bank Group, officially launched their Operating Principles for Impact Management (the Principles).  As of the official launch date, 60 global investors have committed to the Principles.  The first adopters range from large asset managers, private funds to non-profit investment firms.  The focus of the Principles is on impact investing, a term that IFC defines as “investments made into companies or organizations with the intent to contribute to measurable positive social or environmental impact, alongside a financial return.”  IFC adapted this definition from GIIN and notes that impact investing focuses on more than just avoiding harm or managing environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks; it aims to utilize investing’s ability to positively impact society by “choosing and managing investments to generate positive impact while also avoiding harm.”  This focus seemingly goes beyond the UN initiated Principles of Responsible Investing or UN PRI, which were tailored to the idea of responsible investing – investing with the goal of incorporating ESG factors into decisions in order to manage risk and generate long-term returns.
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Growing Pressure from Investors Is Resulting in Increased Climate Change Related Commitments by Some Public Companies

We’ve written previously about Climate Action 100+, an investor led group representing over $32 trillion in assets under management, and its campaign against 161 or so of the largest publicly traded companies seeking to have these companies improve their greenhouse gas emitting practices.

Climate Action 100+ has experienced recent successes in its engagement efforts with a few companies, the details of which are available on its website.  In particular, a few companies have agreed to increased public reporting of their climate change strategies and, most notably, to adopt executive compensation metrics tied to greenhouse gas reduction targets. Recently, the group issued a report describing what it believes the steel industry should do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and related public disclosure of those efforts.
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California Imposes Climate Risk Disclosure Requirements on the U.S.’s Two Largest Pension Funds

Citing concerns of climate change’s impact on the financial sector, California passed SB 964 last week requiring the country’s two biggest pension funds to publicly disclose and analyze their climate-related investment risks. Under the new law, The California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) and California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) must review and report “climate related financial risks” that are “material” to the stability of their public market portfolios. Such “climate-related financial risks” include “intense storms, rising sea levels, higher global temperatures, economic damages from carbon emissions, and other financial and transition risks due to public policies to address climate change, shifting consumer attitudes, changing economics of traditional carbon-intense industries.” SB 964’s obligations, which will take effect on January 1, 2020 and continue every three years until 2035, also require the funds to report on their alignment to the Paris climate agreement, California climate policy goals, and any long-term climate-related financial risks.
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Two Recent Climate Change Disclosure Initiatives Affecting Banks and Greenhouse Gas Emitting Companies

Sixteen banks from four continents commit to furthering the Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosure push for improved climate risk disclosure.  In addition, Climate Action 100+ invigorates its push on 161 large companies with either high greenhouse gas emissions or the potential to impact clean energy to improve their climate change disclosures and governance.  More details as follows:

16 Banks From Four Continents Commit to TCFD Pilot Project

Sixteen banks (Australia and New Zealand Banking Group (ANZ), Barclays, Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria (BBVA), BNP Paribas, Bradesco, Citi, DNB, Itaú Unibanco, National Australia Bank, Rabobank, Royal Bank of Canada, Santander, Société Générale, Standard Chartered, TD Bank Group and UBS) have joined a United Nations Environment Programme – Finance Initiative pilot project to help banks disclose their climate related financial risks in line with the recommendations of the Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (“TCFD”).
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