Search Results for: HCM coalition

Potential Legislation on HCM Reporting and Stock Buybacks

Earlier in the week, a subcommittee of the House Financial Services Committee held a hearing on four draft bills that, if enacted, would impact corporate reporting, and more. Proponents of these bills contend that the disclosure will “provide more information to help investors make decisions based on long-term economic growth.”

What Were the Topics?

1. Mandatory HCM Reporting. Representative Cynthia Axne (D. Iowa) introduced a draft bill to amend the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act) to require issuers to disclose information about human capital management (HCM) in annual reports on topics such as demographics, compensation, composition, skills, culture, health, safety, and productivity.
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Will the SEC Adopt Additional Human Capital Management Disclosure Requirements?

IAC Meeting.  Last week, the Investor Advisory Committee (IAC or Committee) to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) voted to ask the SEC to further investigate and evaluate whether public companies should be required to disclose information related to human capital management (HCM), in other words, how companies manage workplace relationships including training, talent development and retention.

Over the last few decades, as the US economy has increasingly become based on technology and services, certain investors have expressed more interest in HCM disclosure. 
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Investor Group Petitions SEC to Require Disclosure on Human Capital Management

The Human Capital Management Coalition has submitted a rulemaking petition to the SEC to require all public companies to disclose information about its workforce. The petition is signed by Meredith Miller from the UAW Retiree Medical Benefits Trusts, and a list of members is available here.

While the success of any efforts to mandate disclosure through the SEC seems fairly uncertain, the petition represents increasing demands on companies for ESG-related information. The requests, usually in the form of surveys to fill out, may come directly from investors or just as often if not more, from data providers that use whatever information they can gather to assess and rate companies for investors.
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