SEC Announces Summer Roundtable on Short-Term / Long-Term Corporate Management, Regulations and Public Reporting

The SEC has announced that the staff will host a roundtable this summer on important topics such as the short-term / long-term management of public companies and related periodic reporting and regulatory requirements.

The SEC’s four-year strategic plan highlights its focus on the long-term interests of Main Street investors. In its roundtable announcement, the SEC stresses the dual needs of Main Street investors – liquidity to pay for retirement and other expenses while at the same time long-term value to fund increasing longer lifespans – and how disclosure rules should reflect and foster these needs. The SEC questions whether the current disclosure framework and other regulations have encouraged companies and certain investors to prioritize short-term over long-term results.
Continue Reading

Potential Legislation on HCM Reporting and Stock Buybacks

Earlier in the week, a subcommittee of the House Financial Services Committee held a hearing on four draft bills that, if enacted, would impact corporate reporting, and more. Proponents of these bills contend that the disclosure will “provide more information to help investors make decisions based on long-term economic growth.”

What Were the Topics?

  1. Mandatory HCM Reporting. Representative Cynthia Axne (D. Iowa) introduced a draft bill to amend the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act) to require issuers to disclose information about human capital management (HCM) in annual reports on topics such as demographics, compensation, composition, skills, culture, health, safety, and productivity.

Continue Reading

State Street’s New ESG Scoring Tool – Companies and ESG Raters Take Note

Introduction. Earlier this week, we learned that State Street Global Advisors, or SSGA, has created and is currently applying its new Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) platform, known as “R-Factor,” to better inform its investment, engagement, voting, and other decisions regarding any given company. SSGA says that it built R-Factor, its own scoring system, because it believes that the current ESG reporting and scoring landscape lacks standardization and transparency. Moreover, SSGA found that differing methodologies used by the current ESG raters can lead to a variance in company scores. These differences can be critical as asset owners and investment managers seek consistent, comparable and material ESG-related information for their investment analyses.
Continue Reading

Leading ESG Standard-Setters Release How-To Guide for Implementing TCFD’s Climate Risk Disclosure Recommendations

On May 1, 2019, the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) and the Climate Disclosure Standards Board (CDSB) jointly released a how-to implementation guide for implementing the disclosure recommendations of the Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure (TCFD).  TCFD released its final recommendations in June 2017, and as of this post’s writing, 643 organizations have publicly expressed support.  Despite this level of support, companies have lacked, according to the CEO of The SASB Foundation, Madelyn Antoncic, a clear understanding on how to put the recommendations into practice.  It is for this reason that CDSB and SASB teamed up to develop a series of practical TCFD-focused resources, of which the implementation guide is the first.
Continue Reading

IFC Launches Framework for Impact Investing with Commitments by 60 Global Investors

On April 12, 2019, the International Finance Corporation (IFC), a World Bank Group, officially launched their Operating Principles for Impact Management (the Principles).  As of the official launch date, 60 global investors have committed to the Principles.  The first adopters range from large asset managers, private funds to non-profit investment firms.  The focus of the Principles is on impact investing, a term that IFC defines as “investments made into companies or organizations with the intent to contribute to measurable positive social or environmental impact, alongside a financial return.”  IFC adapted this definition from GIIN and notes that impact investing focuses on more than just avoiding harm or managing environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks; it aims to utilize investing’s ability to positively impact society by “choosing and managing investments to generate positive impact while also avoiding harm.”  This focus seemingly goes beyond the UN initiated Principles of Responsible Investing or UN PRI, which were tailored to the idea of responsible investing – investing with the goal of incorporating ESG factors into decisions in order to manage risk and generate long-term returns.
Continue Reading

Recent Executive Order on Energy Infrastructure and Economic Growth – ESG Disclosure and Proxy Voting Implications

President Trump’s Executive Order yesterday on energy infrastructure and economic growth contained an unexpected Section 5 entitled “Environment, Social and Governance Issues; Proxy Firms and Financing Energy Projects Through the United States Capital Markets.”  While the section does not directly address environmental, social and governance (ESG) disclosure, it restates the definition of materiality from the U.S. Supreme Court case, TSC Industries, Inc. v. Northway, Inc., and reiterates a company’s fiduciary duties to its shareholders to strive to maximize shareholder return, consistent with the long-term growth of the company.  This order comes on the heels of last week’s U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing on ESG Principles in Investing and the Role of Asset Managers, Proxy Advisors and Other Intermediaries, as well as ongoing activity at the U.S.
Continue Reading

Will the SEC Adopt Additional Human Capital Management Disclosure Requirements?

IAC Meeting.  Last week, the Investor Advisory Committee (IAC or Committee) to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) voted to ask the SEC to further investigate and evaluate whether public companies should be required to disclose information related to human capital management (HCM), in other words, how companies manage workplace relationships including training, talent development and retention.

Over the last few decades, as the US economy has increasingly become based on technology and services, certain investors have expressed more interest in HCM disclosure. 
Continue Reading

State Street Updates Voting Guidelines and Engagement Protocol

State Street Global Advisors, or SSGA, updated and released earlier this week its Global Proxy Voting and Engagement Principles and Proxy Voting and Engagement Guidelines – North America (US & Canada). SSGA has created a new set of global policies dedicated to what companies can expect when engaging with SSGA on environmental and social matters and how SSGA intends to approach voting on sustainability-related proposals.

In addition, SSGA recently published its latest general issuer engagement protocol (as distinguished from guidelines dedicated to a specific engagement topic) informing its investee companies what to expect when engaging with the asset manager. These guidelines include important information such as where to direct an email requesting an engagement and what information to include.
Continue Reading

The SEC on ESG Disclosure – Latest Developments

At the 18th Annual Institute on Securities Regulation in Europe last week, SEC Director Bill Hinman spoke about the benefits of the SEC’s current, flexible approach to environmental, social and governance (ESG) disclosure for public companies. He noted that current disclosure requirements are largely principles-based and “apply in areas where the disclosure topics may be complex, associated with uncertain risks and rapidly evolving.” Such an adaptable principles-based disclosure regime, Director Hinman posited, is well suited for addressing often complex, risk-laden and rapidly evolving ESG topics, including how companies consider climate change risks, labor practices or board diversity in their decision-making.
Continue Reading

EU Proposes Legislation to Establish Low-Carbon Financial Market Benchmarks

Last week the European Parliament and European Union (EU) member states reached a tentative agreement on proposed legislation that would set standards for low-carbon benchmarks in the EU. In financial markets, a benchmark is essentially an index, or a standard or measure pegged to the value of a “basket” of underlying equities, bonds or other assets or prices, that is used for a variety of investment purposes, such as evaluating the performance of a security, mutual fund, or other investment. Many in the investing community rely on low-carbon benchmarks to create investment products, to measure the performance of investments and for asset allocation strategies.
Continue Reading

LexBlog